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I am attempting to calculate the Mbps of an IO graph. The y axis appears to jump to 1*10^6 after 999,999 bytes. Why is the exponent a 6?

asked 2018-09-23 06:54:16 +0000

Tolein gravatar image

updated 2018-09-27 10:55:02 +0000

grahamb gravatar image

I am attempting to calculate the Mbps of an IO graph. The y axis appears to jump to 1*10^6 after 999,999 bytes. Why is the exponent a 6? After another million bytes the exponent goes to a 7. I feel that I am calculating something wrong. According to my graph the peak Bytes per second is around 6*10^7 from the 4 second mark to the 6 second mark. I am calculating this to be 60,000,000 Bytes. I then divide that by 125,000 to get 480 Mbps. Is this correct? I feel the exponents are throwing me off and questioning if I am interrupting the y axis correctly.

Thanks

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answered 2018-09-23 07:35:55 +0000

updated 2018-09-23 07:58:16 +0000

This is just scientific notation of the numbers you say. 1x10^6 is not a jump from 999,999, it's just 1,000,000 or one million represented in such way because this is more compact.

So, 6x10^7 is exactly 60 million (six followed by 7 zeros). A benefit of this increases with large numbers (which one is easier to interpret for 100 million - 1x10^8 or 100000000?).

There is no error in your calculations and in IO graph too. The only thing that confuses you is notation type.

Keep in mind also if you change "interval" value - Y axis will also be changed.

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Oh I see now. It was right in front of me. Thanks so much for the explanation.

Tolein gravatar imageTolein ( 2018-09-23 14:41:52 +0000 )edit

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Asked: 2018-09-23 06:54:16 +0000

Seen: 82 times

Last updated: Sep 27