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What combination and permutation of version number should/can be used in request and response messages for persistent HTTP connections?

asked 2022-05-30 05:53:23 +0000

updated 2022-05-30 16:22:25 +0000

SYN-bit gravatar image

You can ignore rest of the post and just tell me the version number combinations that are allowed for persistent connections and little bit of why. I thought only 1.1 in request and 1.1 in response was allowed but I am seeing textbooks which are using combinations of 1.0 and 1.1, and 1.0 and 1.0 in request and response messages.

And for simplicity can I just used 1.1 both in request and response in these below figures instead for persistent connections? ​

Rest of the post-:

Image link-: https://i.stack.imgur.com/tsYd8.png

should not we use 1.1 there as that is the version of http for persistent connection? I don’t understand this.

My confusion came due to this paragraph in the book.

Image link-: https://i.stack.imgur.com/85n34.png

HTTP 1.0 is non-persistent whereas HTTP 1.1 is persistent.

Here in figure 8-9 b), we are using persistent connection. But the version of HTP we are using is 1.0.

Remaining page just for context(same page as 1st red arrow confusion)-:

Image link-: https://i.stack.imgur.com/c8k1R.png

And for simplicity can I just used 1.1 both in request and response in these figures for persistent connections?

BELOW THIS ISN’T REQUIRED TO BE READ FOR ANSWERING THIS QUESTION

Not sure if they are related to my question, but I found them while googling about the issue. According to RFC-:

“An HTTP client SHOULD send a request version equal to the highest version for which the client is at least conditionally compliant, and whose major version is no higher than the highest version supported by the server, if this is known. An HTTP client MUST NOT send a version for which it is not at least conditionally compliant.”

Not sure exactly what this would translate to.

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/5...

“An HTTP server SHOULD send a response version equal to the highest version for which the server is at least conditionally compliant, and whose major version is less than or equal to the one received in the request. An HTTP server MUST NOT send a version for which it is not at least conditionally compliant. A server MAY send a 505 (HTTP Version Not Supported) response if cannot send a response using the major version used in the client's request.”

This means-: if server supports 1.1, then for both 1.1 and 1.0 requests, it should respond with 1.1 response if server supports only 1.0, then respond 1.1 request with 1.0 response

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answered 2022-05-30 11:27:27 +0000

Jaap gravatar image

Wikipedia has a nice writeup about this.

TLDR:

  • HTTP/1.0 has an unofficial extension (to the protocol) to signal support for persistent connections.
  • For HTTP/1.1 all connections are considered persistent unless declared otherwise.
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thanks for info. so technically figures are correct

shivajikobardan gravatar imageshivajikobardan ( 2022-05-30 11:59:03 +0000 )edit

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Asked: 2022-05-30 05:53:23 +0000

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Last updated: May 30 '22